Difficulty
  persimmons require minimal effort to manage.
∙ moderately wet climate
Bloom
  buds awaken from dormancy late enough to generally avoid frost damage in most of the US.
pH
  6.0 to 7.0 is preferred but a wide range is tolerated
Yield
 
kaki: 2 - 3 years (clones)
virginiana: 2 - 4 years (clones)
Tolerant
  virginiana is semi-tolerant of saline soil

Climate



The cold hardiness of the American persimmon — when referring to earlier ripening varieties from a northern strain — is not well known, but it is generally said to be zone 5a.  However, there are a few people who have reported no damage after experiencing temperatures between -22F and -31F. If this is fairly consistent, the primary issue with growing persimmons in zone 4 may not necessarily be cold hardiness but the length of the grow season and the amount of heat the area receives.  If your area experiences a grow season around 4.5 to 5.5 months long and ~2250 Grow Degree Days (GDD), based on the information provided at weatherspark, then a partial crop of an early ripening variety might be able to mature before the end of the season, but a GDD of at least 2500-2800 would be more ideal.  An area that experiences less GDD but a longer grow season may be suitable as well.


Pollination



Asian persimmons are parthenocarpic.  They will produce seedless fruit without the presence of a pollinator.  Some female varieties may also produce male flowers, but it could take a few additional years for them to appear.

Wild American persimmons are often self-sterile and require a male and a female tree for fruit production (dioecious), but most named varieties are self-fertile through at least one of the two methods mentioned above.  Furthermore, American persimmons can consist of 90-chromosomes or 60-chromosomes.  Pollinating a 90-chromosome female American persimmon with a 60-chromosome male will give you a higher yield of seedless fruit (most named cultivars are 90-chromosome since they tend to be larger, sweeter, and ripen earlier).  The main problem with this method is that it can be difficult to obtain a 60-chromosome tree.  Additionally, the 60-chromosome strain may not be as cold hardy as the 90-chromosome strain.  They are, however, known to grow near the Ohio river in north central Kentucky, which tells us they are hardy down to at least Zone 6b, but many species native to this longitude in the eastern half of the United States tend to be hardy down to zone 5.


Pests and Diseases



There are currently no significant pests or diseases that harm American persimmons.  Leaf spot is very common, and it can develop quite heavily on some varieties or in some regions, but it generally does not concern anyone and is largely ignored.

Persimmon Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS), an affliction that causes Asian persimmon trees to die within 2 to 5 years, is the only common disease of any significance that occurs in the United States.  It is currently believed to be caused by Xylella fastidiosa,[1] a bacteria that is primarily known for causing Pierce's disease in grapes.  Xylella fastidiosa is often spread by large leafhopppers called sharpshooters, but the primary vector, the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis), can only survive in regions with mild winters.  Based on their distribution map, this should be around hardiness zone 8a or warmer.  Sharpshooters were not mentioned for spreading fastidiosa directly to Asian persimmons, but it did imply that the primary source of infection came from grafting Asian persimmon scionwood onto infected, but asymptomatic, American persimmon rootstock.  Furthermore, there may be another pathogen in some American rootstock that can induce decline (rather than sudden death) in Asian persimmons,[2] but I have only seen mention of this in one country outside of the United States.

Canker is either uncommon or non-existent on American and Asian persimmons in the United States.  Conversely, canker on Asian persimmons has been reported in other countries of various climates, such as Japan, Brazil, Spain, New Zealand, and South Africa.[3][4] The seriousness of the various pathogens that have been isolated from the cankers is hard to determine due to the small number of studies on the issue, but the lack of concern over the past few decades implies it is generally quite rare or easy to control.  One thing that did stick out in the study conducted in South Africa was that lesions were generally longer on Asian persimmon trees that were grafted to American persimmon rootstock than those grafted to Asian persimmon rootstock.[4]

Persimmon anthracnose, caused by the fungi Colletotrichum horii (previously thought to be Colletotrichum gloeosporioides), can damage young twigs, leaves, and fruit.[5] It is uncommon or non-existent in the United States as well as Europe, and the only regions where it seems to be a problem (Korea, Japan, southeastern half of China, and the San Paulo area in Brazil) tend to receive an incredible amount of rainfall at some point during the grow season.  The rate of infection within these countries "might" be increasing, but for many decades, there seemed to be a lack of concern over the disease.  However, poor practices, such as using slightly susceptible yet infected rootstock from wild persimmon trees or planting near forests with high disease pressure, has devastated nurseries and orchards in the past.[5] Most Asian persimmon varieties appear to be fairly susceptible, but some do show resistance, such as Nishimura-wase (Coffee Cake).  Furthermore, there is at least one Chinese variety from the persimmon species Diospyros glaucifolia that is considered to be immune.  Overall, not much effort has been placed into the discovery of resistance varieties.[5]

Circular leaf spot (Mycosphaerella nawae) is a fairly new and serious foliage disease that has recently been found in various countries such China, Korea, Japan, and Spain.  Infected trees may defoliate early which can lead to crop failure.  While there are a number of foliage diseases that can affect persimmon trees, M. nawae may be the most severe.

Moisture from dew and a high relative humidity can be enough to progress maturation and encourage spore dispersal.  However, dispersal is far greater when the fungus is exposed to rainfall.[6][7] In the dry climate of east-central Spain, flood irrigation is a very common practice within persimmon orchards.[7] This may be why M. nawae is allowed to thrive there.

M. nawae has a long incubation period on infected leaves, so fungicides need to be used in spring, long before symptoms appear.[8] Roughly 4 months after full bloom, symptoms are still fairly mild, but defoliation can become significant 2 to 4 weeks after this point.[8] Removal of infect leaf litter and drip irrigation are believed to reduce symptoms, but no studies on the effectiveness of these practices have been done.


Nutrition



Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) can vary significantly within Asian persimmons, depending on the environment, variety, and ripening stage.[9][10] In a 2011 review of multiple studies, the mean value of ascorbic acid in Asian persimmons was 47mg/100g FW (fresh weight).[11] This, however, included one fairly old, often cited study with many "fully mature" varieties that had rather high values in comparison to nearly all others (between 35mg/100g to 218mg/100g, with most residing in the upper half of this range).[12] In more recent studies, the ascorbic acid content resided between 9mg to 87mg/100g, most of which were between 15mg to 43mg/100g.[9][13][14][15]

There seems to be very few studies that determine the ascorbic acid content of American persimmons, and the only one I have access to is the one that gave the majority of the Asian persimmon varieties that were tested an unusually high amount.  It determined that the one American persimmon they analyzed had a total vitamin C content of 86g/100g FW.[12]

Persimmons generally have a water content of ~80%,[16][9][15] which is lower in comparison to the average, commonly available fruit (85-90%).  A higher amount of sugar and pectin partially make up the difference,[14][15] and, perhaps, fiber as well.[16][9] Persimmons have a pH between 5 and 6,[9] which is very high in comparison to most others (less than 4), even while they are still green.  However, rather than being very acidic, unripe persimmons are very astringent.  This is true for both "astringent" and "non-astringent" persimmons.


Astringency



Astringency is the dry, puckering feeling in the mouth, which is generally caused by soluble tannins binding to proteins.  Soluble tannins are present in large amounts in persimmons, but as the fruit ripens, they are converted into non-astringent insoluble tannins.  Some Asian persimmon varieties will lose their astringency around the time they become fully colored, although it may depend on whether they were pollinated or not and how well they were pollinated.  Overall, Asian persimmons can be distributed between four different categories.

1) Pollination-Constant Astringent (PCA): the typical astringent persimmon (this currently consists of all American and hybrid persimmons as well).
2) Pollination-Constant Non-Astringent (PCNA): the typical non-astringent persimmon.
3) Pollination-Variant Astringent (PVA): an astringent persimmon that lacks flavor if it has not been pollinated.
4) Pollination-Variant Non-Astringent (PVNA): an astringent persimmon that lacks flavor if it has not been pollinated.  If it has been pollinated, the flavor improves and it may qualify as a non-astringent persimmon.  

Persimmons are considered to be edible in Japan when the soluble tannin content drops below 0.1% of their fresh weight,[17] and around the time astringent persimmons become fully colored, it often resides between 0.5 to 1%.[18] It will not drop down to an acceptable level until they start becoming very soft, almost like a water balloon, at least in some part.  The soluble tannin content of non-astringent persimmons (PCNA) is roughly 0.5% in their green stage, ~0.2% during their color changing stage, and ~0.1% or lower when they are fully colored.[18]

PCNA and pollinated PVNA (non-astringent and potentially non-astringent) persimmons lose their astringency in different ways.  Soluble tannins in PCNA are primarily diluted as the fruit develops.  This is possible because their tannins have a smaller cell size and their production ceases at a much earlier stage than in astringent varieties.  In pollinated PVNA persimmons, the soluble tannins coagulate and form insoluble tannins from acetaldehyde produced by the seeds.[19] Consequently, pollinated PVNA persimmons with a higher number of seeds will lose their astringency quicker than those with a low number of seeds.[19] A similar event happens in pollinated PVA persimmons, but to a much lesser degree, thus, causing them to remain astringent for a longer period of time.


Diospyrobezoar



A diospyrobezoar is an indigestible mass in the digestive tract caused by shibuol, a soluble tannin largely present in persimmons that haven't ripened enough to lose their astringency.[20][21] In the presence of dilute stomach acid, shibuol coagulates into a cellulose protein structure.[21] Soluble tannins in persimmons are found in higher concentrations near the skin and calyx.

The occurrence of diospyrobezoars are fairly rare, and roughly 80%+ of those who do get them have impaired gastric motility (or acid secretion) due to some form of gastric surgery.[20][21] The majority of the remainder also had a disorder that impairs gastric motility, such as diabetes mellitus or hypothyroidism.  Additionally, improper chewing may have also helped lead to the formation of a diospyrobezoar in some people.[21] In one study of 103 patients who were believed to have had a diospyrobezoar, symptoms developed 1 day to several weeks after consuming persimmons.[20]

Laparoscopy is generally the most invasive procedure required for their removal, since larger incisions are rarely needed.[22] Endoscopic procedures are more common and are often done in combination with carbonated liquid or enzymes to help soften the bezoar.[22] While dissolution alone is often successful with phytobezoars, it is generally not attempted with diospyrobezoars due to their harder consistency.  However, there was one reported case of a nasogastric Coca-Cola lavage that was successful, although the procedure took over 12 hours.[23]

Examples of the kind of persimmon consumption that have lead to the formation of a diospyrobezoar are hard to come by, and it will certainly be different for each individual.  Regardless, a few examples are better than none.  The following three patients had some disorder or gastric surgery that may have caused impaired gastric motility.

1) a 66 year old male said he recently consumed 12 persimmons, but it did not go into further detail.[21]
2) a 51 year old woman mentioned she ate 2 or 3 persimmons per week over the past 6 months.[24]
3) a 70 year old Japanese man with no symptoms was discovered to have a diospyrobezoar during an annual screening.  He claimed to have had 2-3 persimmons each day for 3-4 months during the previous fall and winter season.[22]

In one case involving a patient that may not have had impaired gastric motility, a 27 year old male vegan developed symptoms after switching to a more seasonal food diet for one month that consisted of over 10 persimmons per day.[25]

Overall, people who have impaired gastric motility, or any other issues that are known to lead to diospyrobezoars, are better off avoiding persimmons, especially those that haven't lost all signs of astringency.


Storage



Various Asian persimmon varieties can store for up to 5 months, but if you wish to store them long term, they should be harvested quite early.  The optimal color for storage can vary between varieties (or even location and season), but it appears that once they are no longer green, they are ready for harvest.  Some varieties are mature enough to ripen off the tree while they are still entirely green.  However, harvesting them at this stage, or fairly close to it, may prove to be unwise.  Harvesting too early may cause them to become sensitive to chilling injury below the temperature of 41F/5C.[10][26] When storing persimmons, another thing to consider is that they are very sensitive to ethylene gas and are best stored without the presence of other climateric fruit.  They tend to produce a much greater amount of ethylene than persimmons themselves.[27]

The relative humidity of the storage unit should be between 85-95%.[10][28] 32F/0C is generally recommended, but some varieties, such as Fuyu, may receive chilling injury at this temperature, regardless of the stage they were harvested.  This is, however, not consistent.  Studies from multiple regions have had success with the long term storage of Fuyu (some of which were harvested while they were orange) at the temperature of 32F/0C, while others saw failure in less than a month or two.[28] Furthermore, Asian persimmons, whether they are chill sensitive or not, may have a higher chance of being injured when the storage temperature is set closer to ~41F/~5C.[29][30][31]

Chilling injury can cause Asian persimmons to develop a brown discoloration, a metallic or chlorine-like odor, a mealy or gel-like texture, and a lack of flavor, sweetness, or juiciness.[31] It may also accelerate the loss of firmness or cause the persimmon to dramatically reduce its firmness within a few days after being removed from cold storage.[30]

Overall, there is a lot of variation in the recommended method of storing Asian persimmons based on the various studies that have been released.  They can, however, be used to guide us toward the methods that appear to generate the most success, but some experimentation may be required to find out what works best for the varieties you grow in your particular region.

While it may not be a practical solution for the average home-grower, commercial growers are capable of avoiding injury to chill sensitive varieties through various methods, such as the use of the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)[30], as well as adjusting the concentration of one or more elements, primarily oxygen and carbon dioxide, in a modified atmosphere polyethylene bag.[26][32][33]
1.
2. Decline of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. ) trees on Diospyros virginiana rootstocks, .
3.
4.
5.
6. Inoculum dynamics and disease progress of circular leaf spot of persimmon caused by Mycosphaerella nawae in inland Korea, .
7.
8. Control and yield loss modelling of circular leaf spot of persimmon caused by Mycosphaerella nawae, .
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17. The Natural Removal of Astringency in Sweet Persimmon Fruit and the Distribution of Tannin Substance in Leaf and Fruit, .
18.
19.
20. Surgical Aspects of Gastrointestinal Persimmon Phytobezoar Treatment, .
21.
22.
23. The First Report of Successful Nasogastric Coca-Cola Lavage Treatment for Bitter Persimmon Phytobezoars in Japan, .
24.
25.
26. Post-Harvest and Processing of Persimmon Fruit, .
27.
28.
29. The influence of storage time and temperature on chilling injury in Fuyu and Suruga persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) grown in subtropical Australia, .
30. Temperature and Ultra Low Oxygen Effects and Involvement of Ethylene in Chilling Injury of 'Rojo Brillante' Persimmon Fruit, .
31.
32.
33.




Read More

Asian Persimmon
Diospyros Kaki

varieties in this section generally share these traits (unless stated otherwise)
Asian persimmons are self-fertile and produce seedless fruit in the absence of a pollination partner (parthenocarpy).  Persimmon Sudden Death Syndrome is the only significant problem that faces Asian persimmons in the United States (excluding those that are quite universal).  It is believed to only effect Asian persimmons that were grafted onto American persimmon rootstock.  More details can be found in the "Read More" section.

Chinebuli

🔍
Acquired in Bulgaria, but may have originated in China or Korea like 'Korea Kaki'.
Zone
• 6a
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• non-astringent

Chocolate

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• mid-late?
Fruit
• PVNA

Chocolate is a pollination-variant non-astringent cultivar (PVNA) that produces male and female flowers (monoecious).

Coffee Cake

🔍
Alias
• Nishimura Wase
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid
Fruit
• PVNA

Coffee Cake is a pollination-variant non-astringent cultivar (PVNA), so its flavor greatly benefits from pollination.

Early Fuyu

🔍
bud mutation of Fuyu
Alias
• Matsumoto Wase Fuyu
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• mid-late? (mid)
Fruit
• non-astringent

Eureka

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• mid-late?
Fruit
• astringent

Eureka may produce male flowers (possibly a rare occurrence).

Fire Crystal

🔍
Originated in Central China near the city of Xian.
Alias
• Lintong Huo Jing
Zone
• 7
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• astringent

Fuyu

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• late
Fruit
• non-astringent

Fuyu and Jiro are supposed to be different varieties, but Jiro, along with many other varieties, were originally marketed as Fuyu. 

The chill sensitivity of Fuyu persimmons may vary by region or year (storage details can be found in the "Read More" section).

Giombo

🔍
Zone
• 7a
Ripens
🍊
• mid?     ◦ 2 weeks after Saijo in FL
Fruit
• 4 to 5", astringent

Great Wall

🔍
Originated in China
Zone
• 6b?
Ripens
🍊
• mid? (early-mid)
Fruit
• 3", astringent

Gwang Yang

🔍
Originated in Gwangyang, South Korea.
Zone
• 6b
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• non-astringent

Hachiya

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• late
Fruit
• 4", astringent

Hachiya is a common commercial cultivar.  It is said to be chill tolerant (storage details can be found in the "Read More" section).

Hana Fuyu

🔍
Alias
• Giant Fuyu, Yotsundani
Zone
• 7a
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• non-astringent, larger than Fuyu

Hana Fuyu may be able to produce male flowers. 

Out of the seven varieties that were tested (as far as I am aware), Hana Fuyu was the only one that consisted of more citric acid (0.23% vs 0.02% to 0.12%) than malic acid (0.14% vs 0.14% to 0.18%).  It also had more total acid than the other varieties (0.45% vs 0.21% to 0.35%).

Hanagosho

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• late
Fruit
• non-astringent

Hanagosho can produce male flowers.

Hira Tanenashi

🔍
Zone
• 6b?
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• astringent

Honan Red

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• astringent

Ichikikei Jiro

🔍
bud mutation of Jiro
Zone
• 7a (6b)     ◦ may receive severe dieback in the lower part of zone 6b
Ripens
🍊
• mid? (early-mid)
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• non-astringent

Izu

🔍
Zone
• 6b? (7a)     ◦ may receive some dieback in zone 6b
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• non-astringent

Saijo's flavor appears to be preferred over Izu in cool summer climates. 

The red color of the second image, and even the first, is likely not typical.  The expected color should probably be orange around the time it first becomes ripe.  Izu is an earlier ripening variety and the photo was taken quite late in the season.

Korea Kaki

🔍
Originated near the border of China and North Korea (Zone 5 or 6).
Zone
• 5b? (6a)
Fruit
• astringent

Maekawa Jiro

🔍
bud mutation of Jiro
Zone
• 6b? (7a)
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid? (mid)     ◦ ~1 week before Ichikikei Jiro
Fruit
• non-astringent

Miss Kim

🔍
Originated in Korea.
Zone
• 6a
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• astringent

Ormond

🔍
Zone
• 7? (8)
Ripens
🍊
• very late
Fruit
• 2.6"

Saijo

🔍
Zone
• 6b
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid
Fruit
• astringent

Saijo is mentioned by quite a few nurseries for being hardy down to -10F (zone 6a), but due to the reports I have seen, I am under the impression that this is something you shouldn't take too seriously.  It is best grown in zone 6b or higher. 
Saijo is often said to be noticeably sweeter than most other asian persimmons.

Sheng

🔍
Zone
• 6a? (6b)
Ripens
🍊
• early-mid
Growth
• dwarf
Fruit
• 3 to 4", astringent

Suruga

🔍
Hanagosho x Okugosho
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• very late
Fruit
• non-astringent

Suruga is chill tolerant to temperatures around 32F/0C but sensitive to temperatures closer to 41F/5C.

Tam Kam

🔍
Originated in Korea
Zone
• 6b (6a)     ◦ at least some dieback in 6a
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• non-astringent

Tam Kam may be able to survive zone 6a, but it will experience some dieback.

Tamopan

🔍
Zone
• 7
Ripens
🍊
• late
Fruit
• 3 to 5", astringent

Tamopan is a large, uniquely shaped persimmon that looks like a capped acorn without the pointed end.  The tree can grow up to 30ft in height, which is fairly tall for Asian persimmon cultivars in the US.

Tamopan is generally not recommended due to its supposed lack of sweetness and flavor in comparison to many other Kaki persimmons.

Persimmon
(hybrid)

varieties in this section generally share these traits (unless stated otherwise)
Asian x American hybrid persimmons are self-fertile and produce seedless fruit in the absence of a pollination partner.  While some of them are quite cold hardy, the grow season will likely be too short to ripen them in all but the hottest areas in zone 5.

Kassandra

🔍
Great Wall x Rosseyanka F2 male (Rosseyanka (D. Kaki x D. Virginiana) x D. virginiana)
Zone
• 5 (6a)
Fruit
• 2.5 to 2.75", astringent

Kassandra may greatly increase its ability to tolerate the cold as it ages, possibly allowing it to survive in zone 5a temperatures with some, but not complete, dieback.

Mikkusu

🔍
Josephine (D. Virginiana) x Taishu (D. Kaki).  Developed in Japan.
Alias
• JT-02
Zone
• 5a (4)
Ripens
🍊

• precocious
Fruit
• 2.5 to 3", astringent

Nikita's Gift

🔍
Rosseyanka (D. Kaki x D. Virginiana) x D. Kaki? Developed in Yalta, Ukraine.
Zone
• 6b (6a)
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• 2.5", astringent

Nikita's Gift will probably experience some, but not complete, dieback during lower zone 6a temperatures.  Fruit drop is commonly experienced during the first few years it attempts to produce.

Rosseyanka

🔍
D. Kaki x D. Virginiana.  Developed in Yalta, Ukraine.
Zone
• 5a
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• astringent

Zima Khurma

🔍
Nikita's Gift x D. Virginiana? Developed in Japan.
Alias
• NB-02
Zone
• 5b? (5a)
Fruit
• astringent

American Persimmon
Diospyros Virginiana

varieties in this section generally share these traits (unless stated otherwise)
American persimmons are often self-sterile, but newer varieties and those from the 'Early Golden' strain are generally self-fertile, either through parthenocarpy, the production of male flowers, or a combination of both.  It is uncommon for a persimmon to experience a disease of any significance in the United States.  Leaf and fruit spot are the only ones you will likely experience, and they are cosmetic.  Insect damage is generally irrelevant as well.  While many of them appear to be hardier than what they are typically said to be, only the earliest ripening varieties should be grown near their northern limit.  American persimmons belong to the astringent category.

Celebrity

🔍
Dollywood (Miller x Early Golden) X F58 male (Miller x Early Golden)
Alias
• U-20A
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile?
Afflictions
• disease resistant? (likely referring to leaf or fruit spot)

Celebrity has a milder flavor than most other American persimmons.  It is said to be a decent cultivar for those who like but cannot grow Asian persimmons.

Deer Candy

🔍
Zone
• 5
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile?
Ripens
🍊
• mid-late?
Fruit
• up to 2"

Deer Candy slowly drops its fruit well into late fall.

Deer Magnet

🔍
Zone
• 5
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile?
Ripens
🍊
• mid-late?

Deer Magnet drops its fruit from late fall into early winter.  It is also good for human consumption.

Early Golden

🔍
Discovered in Alton, Illinois (1880).
Zone
• 4
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy and male flowers)
Ripens
🍊
• early     ◦ 1st week of October in Ontario
• precocious
Fruit
• 1.5" to 2"

Early Golden, and many of its female seedlings, produce male flowers, but it appears they primarily show up on weak branches a few years after female flowers begin to produce.  Persimmons pollinated by these male flowers seem to only form a few seeds rather than all eight.

Elmo

🔍
Alias
• A-118
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile?
Fruit
• 1.5"+

Garretson

🔍
Seedling of Early Golden.  Introduced in Pennsylvania (1920).
Zone
• 4
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (male flowers)
Ripens
🍊
• early     ◦ 1st week of October in Geneva, NY — slightly before Early Golden
• precocious
Fruit
• 1.37" to 1.5"

Garretson is more productive than Early Golden.

John Rick

🔍
Seedling of Killen.  Selected in 1958.
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile
Ripens
🍊
• early     ◦ with Early Golden or shortly afterward
• precocious
Fruit
• up to 2"

John Rick produces fairly attractive fruit in comparison to other older varieties. 
While a member of the 'Early Golden' family, John Rick does not appear to be self-fertile.

Lehman's Delight

🔍
Developed in Terra Haute, Indiana.
Alias
• 100-46
Zone
• 5a
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile?
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
Fruit
• over 2" (possibly over 3")

Meader

🔍
Developed in Rochester, New Hampshire.
Zone
• 4a (3b)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy and male flowers)
Ripens
🍊
• early
Fruit
• 1.5" to 2"

Morris Burton

🔍
Originated in Mitchell, Indiana (1957).
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (male flowers)
Ripens
🍊
• early? (early-mid)
• slow to bear

Ripe fruit from Morris Burton fall off the calyx.

Prairie Dawn

🔍
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile
Ripens
🍊
• early

Prairie Star

🔍
Developed in Illinois
Alias
• Early Jewel, H-118
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy)
Ripens
🍊
• early
• precocious
Fruit
• 2"+, possibly up to 3"

Prairie Sun

🔍
Developed in Illinois
Alias
• A-33
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile
Ripens
🍊
• early

Prok

🔍
Selected in Amherst, New York.
Zone
• 4a
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy)
Ripens
🍊
• early
Fruit
• 2.5" to 3"

Prok is sometimes reported to have flavor (and texture) reminiscent of an Asian Persimmon due to its more mild nature.

Ruby

🔍
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile
Ripens
🍊
• mid?
• precocious?

Szukis

🔍
Seedling of Early Golden
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy)
Ripens
🍊
• early? (early-mid)

Valeene Beauty

🔍
Mitchellena x Early Golden
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile?
Ripens
🍊

• precocious
Fruit
• up to 2.5"

Weber

🔍
Originated in Alabama
Zone
• 5a (4)
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-sterile?
Ripens
🍊
• early

Wonderful

🔍
Yates x F-100 male.  Selected in Kentucky.
Zone
• 5a
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile?
Ripens
🍊
• mid? (early-mid)

Yates

🔍
Discovered in southern Indiana (1983)?
Alias
• Juhl
Zone
• 4a
Blooms
💮
•    ◦ self-fertile (parthenocarpy)
Ripens
🍊
• early     ◦ shortly before Garretson
• precocious
Fruit
• 1.37" to 2.5"